Addiction Culture: Private Prisons & Creating the Addict

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Today I read a disappointing clip in the local paper’s list of arrests reporting a person I remember from school being arrested for heroin. In another section was a huge write up about a local drug bust. Most everyone denounces the former person while applauding the latter, and I suppose there’s some reason, but before we clap too loudly about the sweeping drug arrests, let’s get real.

Living in reality, we must realize the fact that we can arrest a million drug dealers, but it solves nothing. We can lock them away, throwing away the key along with their freedoms, but it doesn’t matter. So long as there is demand you can just know for certain there will be a supply. The war on drugs is, and always was, a façade. It is impossible to implement and win simply because we aren’t addressing the real issue of addiction.

Our country has a drug problem, don’t get me wrong, but it’s more of a people problem. We need to figure out how to help addicts fix their lives so there is no more demand—and jail isn’t the answer. All jailing addicts does is feed an ever growing privatized jail and prison system with an insatiable greed that will only be whetted with more inmates.  Making our system of incarceration profitable made justice in its truest sense impossible. These people rarely get a fair shake, and nearly never have the opportunity to address their addiction issues that are generally wrapped up in comorbidity. They’re these huge multifaceted problems so interlaced only dealing with one cures nothing. Meanwhile, suppliers look at addicts as the customers who keep their pseudo-pharmacies alive. This doesn’t even address the addiction culture we create by medicating young children. Yet, here we are locking people away, creating felons who have difficulties securing employment and housing post incarceration, and will probably reoffend because they can’t deal with their addictions.

No. This country doesn’t need more jails and prisons—especially not private, for-profit institutions. We don’t need to hate and blame addicts for our ills. Our country needs to decide why we hate each other and our own lives so much. We need to realize that of the 355 mass shootings this year, only 4 were committed by those who had a blood feud against Americans. The rest were by Americans who hated other Americans—domestic terrorism. What we need to address is a need to understand why we hate each other so much. We need to know why we hate life so much we’d rather self-medicate than enjoy each day. Maybe it’s the disease of capitalistic greed creeping into our brains. Maybe it’s the fact we’re overworked and underpaid. Maybe it’s income disparity. Or, just maybe, it’s the fact we never deal with problems as they come, but instead blame everyone but ourselves. No matter, criminalizing addiction is like blaming the smoker for his cancer. Yes, in part, it was a choice, but it’s still a disease in need of a cure nonetheless.

 

(Image Source: http://www.freeenterprisewarriors.com/free-warrior-blog/jims-blog/dealingwithaddiction/)

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